I’m not racist, but I like candy

I’m not racist, but I like candy.

Screen shot 2013-08-28 at 11.12.25 AMNote: “I’m not racist, but” is not a valid legal disclaimer

That title looks ridiculous, even though grammatically it’s correct. Saying it out loud it almost sounds like the start of a Seussian rhyme, as though the second line should be “I like beaches because they’re sandy” followed by a picture of a mammal in ridiculous headgear. Normally when we hear “I’m not racist, but…” a mind mentally readies itself to hear something awful. “… Filipino call centres are the worst, they never know what they’re talking about,” or “Indian cab drivers are terrible, they never know where they’re going”. Ultimately, these statements are blanket statements, insulting a whole race based on their job. They’re undeniably racist, and for a long time I’ve wondered why people bothered prefacing it “”I’m Not Racist, But” (INRB) in the first place. Continue reading I’m not racist, but I like candy

Do All Asians Look Alike?

Last week I posted up my thoughts on the question: “Where are you from?” and I had some pretty interesting responses. There were two distinct voices that came out of the ensuing discussion. A number of people believed that most uses of that question are genuinely curious. With the right tone and intent, the conversation is a great way of learning about each other’s cultural history. On the other hand, some believe that it is intrusive and rude. The question to them is like a reworded and nice way of profiling you. Continue reading Do All Asians Look Alike?

Everyday racism as an Asian Australian

The Adventures of The Story Collector - Where are you really from?
Source: The Story collector comic: Where are you really from?

Being an Alien in Your Own Land

I was born in Australia to parents who arrived as refugees to Australia and escape the war in Vietnam. I considered myself to be more Australian and I have encountered everyday racism. Continue reading Everyday racism as an Asian Australian

Why are we afraid of peace?

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A few weeks ago I was on a tram heading down Swanston Street when I spotted a table on the corner of Bourke Street. From memory, there were two people at the table, nodding and greeting to the people walking by. The table was covered with the usual flyers and books. A banner sits at the front and advertised to “Say no to Islamophobia”. While their jumpers said “Islam = peace, phobia = fear” and “Why are you afraid of peace?” Continue reading Why are we afraid of peace?

Discussing and Collecting Stories about Racism in Australia